Sessions

Tuesday, September 20

MTSS/RTI From A to Z and K to 12
Mark Shinn, Ph.D.
NASP Practice Domains: Domain 1: Data-based Decision-making and Accountability
Domain 2: Consultation and Collaboration
Domain 3: Interventions and Instructional Support to Develop Academic Skills
Domain 5: School-Wide Practices to Promote Learning
Domain 6: Preventive and Responsive Services

The service delivery model now commonly referred to as Multi-Tier Systems of Support (MTSS) has evolved over a 36 year time frame from Problem Solving to RTI to MTSS with changes attributable to good practice, more research, and changes in law and regulation. This session will present a contemporary perspective on data-based decision making, including screening and progress monitoring, early identification, and research-based intervention of increasing intensity for academics and behavior. An “every ed” perspective will be used to dispel that any particular group (i.e., general education, special education) owns it and the interplay between groups is synergistic with respect to high quality implementation. However, regardless of synergy, special education (and school psychologists) leads! For example, changes in SLD identification practices facilitate more powerful core and remedial intervention. Changes in IEP goals expedite basic skills growth and development of progress monitoring for all students. Topics will include good screening and early identification practices, differences in elementary and secondary implementation, and special education decision making, including eligibility.

Wednesday, September 21

Ethics of School Psychologists Using Technology in Practice
By Dan Florell, Ph.D.
NASP Practice Domains: Domain 10: Legal, Ethical, and Professional Practice

Ethical decision making has become very difficult for school psychologists as more of the job requires using a variety of technology. Often the technology is so new that school psychologists have difficulty learning how to utilize the technology much less be aware of possible ethical issues in its use. This workshop will look into the use of the new technology by school psychologists and raise awareness on possible ethical issues that can arise.

Using Assessment Results to Design Interventions for Executive Functions Deficits
By Milt Dehn, Ph.D.
NASP Practice Domains: Domain 1: Data-based Decision-making and Accountability
Domain 3: Interventions and Instructional Support to Develop Academic Skills
Domain 6: Preventive and Responsive Services

This presentation will provide step-by-step guidance in using assessment data to design interventions for executive functions deficits. The structure and report format of the recently released McCloskey Executive Functions Scale (MEFS; McCloskey, 2016) will be used as a model for assessment results that can facilitate intervention design. The MEFS is a standardized, norm-referenced rating scale designed to assess teacher perceptions about students’ use of executive functions. Selecting interventions typically involves selecting executive function skills, such as planning, initiating, and revising that can be directly taught (Dawson & Guare, 2004). This session will review a menu of evidence-based executive skills training options that can be matched with needs identified through assessment with the MEFS.

Throughout the session, a case study of child with Autism Spectrum Disorder will be used to illustrate how the MEFS can identify specific executive function deficits in need of intervention. For example, the case study frequently had a production deficit in a specific executive function. That is, the case study had the executive skill and could perform it but did not independently recognize the cues that performance of the executive skill was needed.

Trauma, Developmental Disabilities, and Autism Spectrum Disorder
By Rhiannon Steffan Law, Kassandra Lowery, and Carla M. Mangonon
NASP Practice Domains: Domain 4: Interventions & Mental Health Services to Develop
Social & Life Skills
Domain 6: Preventive and Responsive Services
Domain 10: Legal, Ethical, and Professional Practice

With all the knowledge about the effects of trauma on children with DD and ASD, practitioners and School Psychologists are responsible for providing support and interventions for this population. This presentation will provide practitioners with an understanding of the pervasive effects of trauma on children with DD and ASD, how to recognize warning signs in schools, and available treatment options. This presentation will incorporate these treatment parameters into the NASP Practice Model with a focus on direct, student-level services as well the ethical and legal foundations for providing services to this vulnerable population.

The Rating Scale of Impairment: Introduction and Application
Jodi Kennis, MHS
NASP Practice Domains: Domain 1: Data-based Decision-making and Accountability
Domain 3: Interventions and Instructional Support to Develop Academic Skills

The Rating Scale of Impairment (RSI™) is a powerful, psychometrically sound rating scale that will assist school psychologists who are committed to Best Practices. The RSI™ is designed to assess one’s level of functional impairment in youth from five through 18 years of age. The RSI™ is designed to meet the need for a measure of impairment that can be used with any other symptom-based diagnostic tools when forming a diagnosis to provide a complete assessment of the individual’s level of functional limitations across different life areas and assist in planning and monitoring treatments. Youth can be rated by parents/caregivers as well as teachers/childcare providers. The RSI™ is a comprehensive rating scale that can be completed online or in paper-and-pencil format. The RSI™ provides the clinician with essential information of the youth’s functional impairment in several key areas: School/Work, Social, Mobility, Domestic, Family, and Self-Care (13-18 form onl13-18 form only). Attendees will receive an in-depth review of these scores and scales and how they can apply this knowledge in their everyday practice. Once the forms have been completed, practitioners are able to score them using paper-and-pencil or online scoring. Practitioners are able to produce three types of reports. The interpretive report provides detailed results for one administration. The comparative report provides a multi-rater perspective that combines the results of up to five different raters. The progress monitoring report provides an overview of change over time by combining the results of up to four administrations from the same rater. Attendees will see examples of each type of report and how they can use the information to develop interventions and progress monitor. The RSI™ was standardized on 2,800 cases across the United States. Scale development and key psychometric properties will be highlighted. After reviewing the RSI™, a relevant case study will be applied to the author recommended interpretation process to increase participant confidence when using the RSI™ when they return to their schools following the conference.

Future Mandated Reporters: Understanding the Role
By Sara Golomb, Ph.D.
NASP Practice Domains: Domain 6: Preventive and Responsive Services
Domain 10: Legal, Ethical, and Professional Practice

Mandated reporting is the legal requirement to report suspected child maltreatment. Despite sanctions for failing to comply, reports are not made for many reasons. This study examined how mandated reporting is addressed in graduate training. Attendees will review their duties and will be provided potential recommendations to improve training. The current state of training is explored, themes that require additional exploration are identified, and recommendations to address the gaps in training will be discussed. This session applies not only to graduate educators and supervisors, but to early career professionals who are not yet feeling confident in their understanding of their duty, of how to proceed when maltreatment is suspected, or how to handle a situation when they are told specifically not to report. Additionally seasoned professionals who would prefer a review of their role are also welcome.

Mandated Reporting: Laws, Ethics, Barriers, and Recommendations
By Sara Golomb, Ph.D.
NASP Practice Domains: Domain 6: Preventive and Responsive Services
Domain 10: Legal, Ethical, and Professional Practice

School Psychologists have a duty as mandated reporters to take action to safeguard children when there is suspected abuse or neglect. As graduate students they receive extensive coursework and field based training in how to support the needs of children, yet training with respect to future roles as mandated reporters is often more limited. Preparation is critical. With targeted training in course work and field work, graduate students are able to develop the confidence and competence to handle a situation of suspected abuse or neglect.

Assessing and Developing the Skills Required for Reading and Writing Success
By Kathleen T. Williams, Ph.D., WPS
NASP Practice Domains: Domain 3: Interventions and Instructional Support to Develop Academic Skills

During this session the skills listed in the final National Early Literacy Panel (NELP) report and the What Works: An Introductory Teacher Guide for Early Language and Emergent Literacy Instruction will be clarified with both examples and intervention strategies. The session will focus on the areas for which there is both evidence for effective instruction and a causal relationship. These include print and phonological awareness skills and are the basis of a code-focused instructional approach. This information will help school psychologist when working directly with children in preschool and kindergarten settings and when counseling parents on how best to support the literacy development of their preschool children.

Thursday, September 22

Recent Advances in Understanding Word-Level Reading Problems: Assessment and Highly Effective Intervention
By David Kilpatrick, Ph.D.
NASP Practice Domains: Domain 1: Data-based Decision-making and Accountability
Domain 3: Interventions and Instructional Support to Develop Academic Skills

Empirical research on reading acquisition and reading disabilities over the last two decades has much to offer practicing schools psychologists. Research on orthographic memory (how we remember the words we read) sheds light on the nature and causes of word-level reading disabilities. School psychologists will learn how to identify why students struggle in reading using commercially available assessment tools. Research will be presented which shows that most reading difficulties can be prevented and corrected. This information will assist school psychologists when they with consult with teachers regarding reading difficulties/disabilities. Such information can help substantially boost the effectiveness both RTI and special educational reading interventions.

Speech Pathologists and School Psychologists Joining Forces: Collaborative Assessment, LD Identification, and Intervention Development
By Andrew Shanock, Ph.D.
NASP Practice Domains: Domain 1: Data-based Decision-making and Accountability
Domain 2: Consultation and Collaboration

This entertaining and informative presentation will show how school psychologists and speech pathologists can adopt the Cattell Horn Carroll (CHC) assessment framework so they may produce a single comprehensive evaluation. Through this structured collaboration more precise diagnoses and interventions can be developed. Further, this approach can reduce evaluation time by one hour per child. Common assessment batteries used by these professionals (such as the CELF, WISC, WJ, TAPS, TOLD) will be reviewed to identify the specific cognitive constructs they measure, the cultural and linguistic demands of the various subtests, and how to reduce over-testing. Specific researched based interventions that may be connected to cognitive profiles will also be reviewed. Finally, sample evaluations will be distributed and discussed.

An Introduction to the Early Cognitive and Academic Development (ECAD) test
By Joseph Claeys, HMHCO
NASP Practice Domains: Domain 1: Data-based Decision-making and Accountability

This workshop will provide an overview of the new WJIV ECAD. The ECAD is specifically designed for young children from ages 2:6 through 7:11, with an extended range up to age 9:11. It has unique tests as well as downward extensions of WJIV tests with improved item density. Because the test has a better item representation of certain skills we will discuss using the test for formative interpretations. The ECAD has a number of new eligibility metrics that may assist teams. And we will conclude with a couple of case studies.

Using the WIIIP to Improve Student Outcomes with Targeted Interventions
By Joseph Claeys, HMHCO
NASP Practice Domains: Domain 1: Data-based Decision-making and Accountability
Domain 3: Interventions and Instructional Support to Develop Academic Skills

The Woodcock Interpretation and Instructional Interventions Program for the WJIV, ECAD, and WMLS-R is an expert system for interpreting test results that provides a direct link between assessment data and evidence based interventions. In this workshop we will go over the features of the WIIIP which includes a report generation assistance and qualitative checklists, using case studies to show how you can efficiently design individual interventions based off of student test scores.

Assessing and Developing the Skills Required for Reading and Writing Success
By Kathleen T. Williams, Ph.D., WPS
NASP Practice Domains: Domain 3: Interventions and Instructional Support to Develop Academic Skills

During this session the skills listed in the final National Early Literacy Panel (NELP) report and the What Works: An Introductory Teacher Guide for Early Language and Emergent Literacy Instruction will be clarified with both examples and intervention strategies. The session will focus on the areas for which there is both evidence for effective instruction and a causal relationship. These include print and phonological awareness skills and are the basis of a code-focused instructional approach. This information will help school psychologist when working directly with children in preschool and kindergarten settings and when counseling parents on how best to support the literacy development of their preschool children.

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